Inside scarred minds
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Article/book #: 16696
Title: Inside scarred minds
By: Daniel Day-Lewis  
Published in: The Times/Sunday Times
Date of issue: Sunday, 20 March 2005

Cross-reference(s):
  1. Refers to this utterance, by Rafael Eitan
  2. Reprinted in this book
  3. This piece by Day-Lewis upset the right-wing gentile columnist, Julie Burchill, who thinks that Day-Lewis, as someone who is partly Jewish, should follow tribal instincts rather than universalist humanitarian concerns -- see this article by Julie Burchill in Ha'aretz
Commentary (by a person who is not a member of the UCC Palestine Solidarity Campaign ):

Daniel Day-Lewis is one of Hollywood's biggest stars, known best for his intense performances in films such as In the Name of the Father and The Unbearable Lightness of Being. His report from the Gaza Strip provides a vivid description of life under occupation, and how ordinary people cope with extraordinary situtations.

The report is significant in another respect as well, since Hollywood has always been a bastion of Zionist support, and no major star has ever dared to criticize Israeli actions in the past. Given the high visibility of these figures, sometimes there words have more of an influence than those of scholars and historians. And Daniel Day-Lewis is no Arnold Schwarzenegger; he has a reputation for being a very intelligent and sensitive person.
Abstract:

On his first visit to the Gaza Strip, Daniel Day-Lewis meets the Palestinian families living in the heart of the danger zone — and the psychologists who are counselling them...

In the Gaza Strip the Israeli army reacts to stone-throwing with bullets. It responds to the suicide bombs and attacks of Palestinian militants by bulldozing houses and olive groves in the search for the perpetrators, to punish their families, and to set up buffer zones to protect Israeli settlements. It bars access to villages, and multiplies checkpoints, cutting Gaza's population off from the outside world. MSF's psychologists are trying to help Palestinian families cope with the stress of living within these confines; visiting them, treating severe trauma and listening to their stories...

Israel's tanks and armour-plated bulldozers can come with no warning, often at night. The noise alone, to a people who have been forced to suffer these violations year after year, is enough to freeze the soul. Israeli snipers position themselves on rooftops. Householders are ordered to leave; they haven't even the time to collect pots and pans, papers and clothes before the bulldozers crush the unprotected buildings like dinosaurs trampling on eggs — sometimes first mashing one into another, then covering the remains with a scoop of earth. Those caught in the incursion zone will be fired on. Even those cowering inside their houses may be shot at or shelled through walls, windows and roofs. The white flag carried by humanitarian workers gives little protection; we'll have warning shots fired at us twice before the week is out.

...

On October 15, 2000, Abu was at home with his wife when Israeli settlers emerged on a shooting spree. He and his family fled to Khan Yunis. After four days he returned. He was hungry. There was no bread, no flour. He killed four pigeons and prepared a fire on which to grill them. The soldiers arrived suddenly, about 20 of them, and entered the house. He followed them upstairs. "Where are you going?" he asked. One smashed his head into a door, breaking his nose. They kicked him down the stairs and out of his house. They kicked half his teeth out and left him with permanent damage to his spine. "If you open your mouth we'll shoot you," they said. They left, returning in a bigger group an hour later, to occupy the top of his house, sealing the stairway with a metal door and razor wire. The family has lived in constant fear ever since. The soldiers urinated and defecated into empty Coke bottles and sandbags, hurling them into his courtyard. They menaced his children with their weapons. After two years of this an officer asked: "Why are you still here?" "It's my house," he replied.

For four years, Abu Saguer has been afraid to go out, afraid to leave his wife and children alone. He is a prisoner in his own home, just as the Palestinians are prisoners within their own borders. The facade of self-government is an absurdity. The Strip, with its 1.48m Palestinians, is a vast internment camp, the borders of which shrink as more and more demolition takes place, and within which the population rises faster than anywhere else in the world. Meanwhile, about 7,000 Israeli settlers live in oases of privileged segregation. This is a state of apartheid. It's taken me less than a week to lose impartiality. In doing so, I may as well be throwing stones at tanks. For as MSF's president, Jean-Hervé Bradol, has said, "The invitation to join one side or the other is accompanied by an obligation to collude with criminal forms of violence."








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